d'Iberville's expeditions
Fragment from the Journal of the Third Voyage of Le Moyne d’Iberville to Louisiana
AN, Marine, 2JJ 56 (X, 19), 1701 After Cavelier de La Salle's failed attempt, the colonization of Louisiana was halted for a dozen years. Pierre d'Iberville, a Canadian from the Lemoyne family of Normandy, was granted permission by Louis XIV to establish a colony in Louisiana. He left France in the autumn of 1698, at the head of a fleet of five ships. After a stopover in Santa Domingo, Iberville located the Mississippi River and built a fort on a beach near a village of Biloxi Indians.
Fragment from the Journal of the Third Voyage of Le Moyne d’Iberville to Louisiana
AN, Marine, 2JJ 56 (X, 19), 1701


Discovery of the waters of the Mississippi and of the Louisiana by Le Moyne d’Iberville (1699)
BNF, Estampes This wooden fort, christened "Maurepas" in honor of the Minister of the Navy, was soon at the center of a village which became the colony's first capital: Biloxi. Iberville then built a square fort in the Mississippi delta in order to control access to the river.
Discovery of the waters of the Mississippi and of the Louisiana by Le Moyne d’Iberville (1699)
BNF, Estampes


Plan de la première ville de La Mobile vers 1705
CAOM, DFC Louisiane, 6A/119 He visited Louisiana three times between 1699 and 1702, traveling the length of the colony, making contact with most of the Indian tribes and keeping a valuable record of his journeys. In 1701-1702, instead of occupying the Spanish site of Pensacola, he had his brother build Fort Louis and the village of Mobile. Mobile took its name from the Mobile Indians, who had given their name to the river and the bay in which the village was located. Mobile was the first commercial implantation in the new colony, and it was soon populated with about a hundred Canadian and French colonists, soldiers and men of the cloth, as well as several slaves.
Plan de la première ville de La Mobile vers 1705
CAOM, DFC Louisiane, 6A/119


some of the first travels