Colonization begins

d'Iberville did not return to Louisiana after 1703. He left the command of the colony to his younger brother Jean-Baptiste de Bienville, and died fighting the English in the Antilles in 1706. In 1709, the French took Pensacola from the Spanish, and later returned it. A very difficult time ensued: the war in Europe left the fledgling colony isolated. Unaware of the resources the region possessed, the colonists had to depend on the Indians for their subsistence. In religious matters, the Jesuits and priests from the Missions Etrangères shared missionary and church-related activities. In 1711, after a catastrophic flood, the town of Mobile was relocated closer to the sea, and the new Mobile became the capital of Louisiana. At the mouth of the bay, Dauphin Island served as a deep-water port, until it was destroyed in a cyclone in 1717.

Du Sault, View of the Dauphin Island port, 1717
BNF, Cartes et Plans, SH 138 (10-8 d)
Du Sault, View of the Dauphin Island port, 1717
BNF, Cartes et Plans, SH 138 (10-8 d)