A colony traded and divided
Three years after governor Kerlérec arrived in Louisiana, in June of 1756 war was declared between England and Prussia on one side, and Austria, Spain and France on the other.

Registry of the transfer to Spain by the Upper Council of Louisiana
CAOM, C13A 44, f° 124 By 1755, the Acadians had been chased out of New Scotland, and the fall of Quebec and Montreal in 1760 spelled the end of New France. In Louisiana, goods rotted in the warehouses for lack of ships to carry them, and only the territory's size and lack of commercial appeal saved the English, who took Fort Duquesne in Illinois. Kerlérec's scrupulous honesty put him in direct opposition with the local "élite", who were accustomed to corruption, black markets and gambling. Starting in 1761, the new Minister of the Navy, Choiseul, under the terms of a "Family Agreement", planned to transfer Louisiana to Spain as a gesture of thanks—even though the Spanish had failed to keep the English from taking Guadeloupe and Martinique.
Registry of the transfer to Spain by the Upper Council of Louisiana
CAOM, C13A 44, f° 124

In addition to Canada, the English were given the town of Mobile and the entire eastern half of Louisiana, with the exception of New Orleans.

Account of the transfer of Mobile to the English commander Robert Farmar
CAOM, C13A 43, f° 283, 20 octobre 1763 Account of the transfer of Mobile to the English commander Robert Farmar
CAOM, C13A 43, f° 283, 20 octobre 1763
Account of the transfer of Mobile to the English commander Robert Farmar
CAOM, C13A 43, f° 283, 20 octobre 1763


the transfer of Lousiana to Spain and England