The Spanish and English

The Treaty of Paris was signed in February 1763. Although the English quickly took possession of Mobile (October 1763), they had to confront, in October 1765, the Illinois Indians, led by Pontiac, in order to take control of Fort Duquesne in Illinois.
The English met with great difficulties with the Indian tribes along the length of the Mississippi, while French merchants founded the town of Saint Louis in 1766, which brought together the region's Creole population.

The city of  Saint Louis in 1796
Service Historique de la Marine, cartes et plans du Service Hydrographique, Recueil 68/80
The city of Saint Louis in 1796
Service Historique de la Marine, cartes et plans du Service Hydrographique,
Recueil 68/80

The terms of the Spanish-French treaty were unknown to Louisiana's residents until September 1764, when orders reached New Orleans. At this time, the first Acadians arrived in Louisiana. Oddly enough, "Spanish" Louisiana continued to be held by the French: it was only in 1766 that Ulloa was appointed governor by Charles III.

The revolution of 1768-69 in New Orleans
CAOM, Colonies, C13A 48, f° 38, 23 décembre 1768 In New Orleans, Ulloa came into rapid opposition with the Creole population, and the French military refused to obey his orders. In March 1768, Ulloa-who had refurbished the Balise military post for his personal use-attempted to bring Louisiana's trade policies into line with Spanish regulations. The colonists revolted, and Ulloa was forced to flee. A sort of Creole directorate was set up while Aubry, the French ordonnateur who had remained in Louisiana in the absence of any Spanish authority, stood by powerless.
The revolution of 1768-69 in New Orleans
CAOM, Colonies, C13A 48, f° 38, 23 décembre 1768


the transfer of Louisiana to Spain and England