The Natchez Indian wars
Remarks from residents sumitting requests for slaves to the Council Registry..., October 30, 1726
CAOM, DPP Recensements, G1 464 Beginning in 1713, the English colonies carried out an aggressive commercial and diplomatic policy to gain the approval of Indians from the areas of the Mississippi and Illinois Rivers (the Choctaw, Natchez and Chickasaw tribes). The situation took an abrupt turn for the worse in 1729. In response to the arrogance of the commander of the French garrison at Fort Rosalie—who built his house on the site of a Natchez Indian village—Indian warriors attacked, killing soldiers as well as men, women and children, and then pillaging their homes. In all, approximately 60 black slaves and 183 French colonists died.
Remarks from residents sumitting requests for slaves to the Council Registry..., October 30, 1726
CAOM, DPP Recensements, G1 464

The slaughter sent fear throughout the colony, which lived with the idea of a peace purchased with annual gifts to Indian tribes. Governor Périer sent two expeditions to punish the Natchez Indians.

The Natchez forts in 1731
CAOM, Collection Moreau de Saint-Méry, F3 290/18
The Natchez forts in 1731
CAOM, Collection Moreau de Saint-Méry, F3 290/18
Dumont de Montigny, Consequences of the war with the Natchez Indians to New Orleans and surrounding areas: all concessions marked with an A have been abandoned
Service historique de la Marine, Service Hydrographique, Recueil 68/61 The first succeeded in recovering fifty French women and a hundred black slaves who had been taken prisoner. The second, led by Périer himself, almost completely eliminated the tribe. Although more than a hundred Natchez took refuge with the Chickasaws, the rest were killed. About 500 survivors were deported and sold as slaves in Santa Domingo. Despite this, a large number of trading partners took fright and returned to France.
Dumont de Montigny, Consequences of the war with the Natchez Indians to New Orleans and surrounding areas: all concessions marked with an A have been abandoned
Service historique de la Marine, Service Hydrographique, Recueil 68/61